A Weekend in Witch City

I can finally cross something off my bucket list because I got to Salem, MA over the Columbus Day Weekend.  The only downside was that a family emergency came up so we were only able to stay one night instead of the original 3 days of sight-seeing, museum hopping and some light shopping I had planned, however, we still managed to cram as much as we could into the few hours that we had.

This is a trip that I’ve been wanting to do for a while and I am so happy that I even managed to go so during Halloween (aka the entire month of October), all the while looking my “bruja(witch)-best” in pieces from Torrid.  Here are some highlights from the trip. Sure, the (official) spooky season may be coming to an end but there’s no time limit on travel and fashion inspo, right?

*This is a post sponsored by Torrid and features gifted product I selected.*

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Sacred Heart Moto

One of the most popular kinds of tops in plus size fashion has got to be dolman sleeve top. I’m not exactly sure when or how that trend got started,  but it is so common that I stay away from it as it tends to be a boxy cut and usually made of a chiffon fabric.

That is until this one caught my eye while I was scrolling through the Torrid site. Admittedly the print is one that  you have to try on to really see the appeal and that is just what I had to do for me to fall in love with it. You may be wondering, what is it about this sacred heart print that got me interested to begin with. Well, for those of you that may be new to my blog, I’m actually an Art and Design historian who specializes in 17th and 18th century Baroque Art. Moreover, the sacred heart is a traditional Catholic symbol created in sometime during the Middle Ages/Gothic period but was prominently used during the Baroque period to encourage devotion and mediation upon the graces of Christ among the illiterate members of  their congregations.

Typically this symbol is depicted in art as a heart with flames pouring from the top, like a symbol of intense burning love.  It is a Baroque theological referent that was part of the blending the form of light and performance that defines the artistic style of that time used in order to inspire people to accept the Catholic faith, and by extension, Western culture during their conquests.  As you can tell I literally can go on about this for hours, hahaha. I mean I even have a PowerPoint presentation in my external hard-drive on the use of such symbols and the role they played in the Spanish conquest of Latin America. Continue reading